Self-Help for Anxiety

Click here to find out about the 5 kinds of anxiety and how you can help relieve them from acupuncturist and author Carolyn Provencher  – another in a series of videos from the presentations at our “Myth-Busting & Self-Help Tips” forum last Saturday!

 

 

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Medicare Myths & Free Volunteer Support: Forum Video

Wow! What a wonderful forum we had on “Myth-Busting & Self-Help Tips” from our local experts as part of our 10th anniversary celebration!

For those of you who were unable to make it to Marquette, MI last Saturday (and those who did and would like a review as well as to share it with friends and family), we’ll be posting links to videos of the presentations throughout the week.

Click here to watch “Navigating the Medicare Maze” with Darren Young, Manager of Business & Community Relations at UPCAP.

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The Wonders of Apple Cider Vinegar, by Jenny Magli

apple.jpgApple cider is known as Mother Nature’s miracle medicine!

Apple cider vinegar, (ACV), is a golden liquid concentrated with the healthy goodness of apples. It contains over 30 important nutrients, 12 minerals, essential acids and enzymes. The vitamins are bio-flavonoids, (vitamin P), beta-carotene, (precursor to vitamin A), vitamin C, E, B1, B2, and B6, and it has a large dose of pectin for a healthy heart.

ACV is inexpensive, easy to use and it benefits our health in many ways. ACV can benefit both people and their pets. It is antibacterial, anti-fungal and boosts the immune system. As a high potassium electrolyte balancer, it helps re-mineralize the body and normalize the blood’s ph balance. ACV is the natural king of skin remedies. It is wonderful for itching and scratching pets as well as a superb skin and hair conditioner. Good old apple cider vinegar, straight or diluted 50/50 with water can be applied directly to the affected area and allowed to dry. It will kill bacteria on hot spots, eliminate dandruff, rejuvenate hair and skin, and help sweeten and balance the pH levels in the body.

Apple cider vinegar is a powerful detoxifying and purifying agent. It breaks down fatty, mucous and phlegm deposits within the body. By breaking down these substances it improves the health and function of the vital organs, such as the kidneys, bladder and liver, by preventing excessively alkaline urine. Put a tablespoon of ACV in your dog’s drinking water every day and you will no longer have those brown spots in your lawn from the dog’s urine.

It also promotes digestion, assimilation and elimination, while neutralizing toxic substances that enter the body. It has been found to neutralize harmful bacteria that may be found in certain foods. While dogs and cats do not have to worry too much about the bacteria in raw meat, if you are in doubt, you can pour a little apple cider vinegar over the questionable item.

ACV can also be beneficial for symptoms such as tooth decay and splitting of your dog’s toenails, which can be symptoms of potassium deficiency. Potassium is essential for the replacement of worn-out tissues within the body. This mineral is also as important to soft tissue repair as calcium is to the bones and teeth, which makes it a wonderful supplement for senior dogs.

ACV can be beneficial in the treatment of arthritis, as a supplement added to your pet’s daily water supply (or poured over the food) or with compresses soaked in hot, (not scalding) ,vinegar applied directly to the joints. It can also be helpful when used to treat allergies, candida, (yeast), constipation, muscle cramps, diarrhea, ear discharge, eczema, fatigue, kidney stones, kidney and bladder problems, slow metabolism, and stiff joints, and many other maladies.

The supplementation of ACV has been known to remove naturally  red tear stains around pet’s eyes from the inside out. It is also used to prevent fleas when used in a rinse for the dog’s coat after a bath.

There is nothing beneficial about commercial distilled vinegars except for pickling, cleaning and disinfection! So be sure to get natural apple cider vinegar, which you can find in health food stores. It should be a rich amber color with the “mother” quite visible as sediment on the bottom.

Jenny is a Certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people, and an Animal Iridology and Healing Touch for Animals (Level 2) practitioner. She is available for consultations and presentations and can be reached at (906) 235-3524 or 1healthlink@gmail.com.

Reprinted with permission from the Spring 2010 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2010. All rights reserved.

*Join us for Myth-Busting & Self-Help Tips: YOUR Health & Happiness Forum, Saturday, Sept. 30th 2017, 1 pm – 4 pm in the Community Room on the lower level of the Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI, and help us celebrate our 10th Anniversary.  Click here for more info!

**FOLLOW us here and/or on Facebook to be entered to WIN in our 10th Anniversary drawing! 

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Finding Your Fortune, by Roslyn McGrath

pot of gold

What if . . . you received each dollar that came your way with appreciation for all the unknown people through whose hands it had passed, as well as for its potential uses in your life?

 

What if . . . you looked at each penny spent as a clear expression of your values and priorities?

 

What if . . . you felt the balance between what you are giving and what you are getting, each time you made a purchase or received a check?

 

What if . . . you deeply appreciated the wide range of exchange options a monetary system can offer?

 

What if . . . you intended that all the money you spend or give brings good to all its future recipients?

 

Take a moment to imagine doing one or more of these practices. How does it feel?

 

What kind of impact do you think integrating such practices in your life might make on you and others?

 

Most of us were not raised to act on, or even consider, such possibilities. Typically money has been both deified and vilified in our society, yet money is simply a tool, a vehicle for exchange, whose potential is what we make of it. Often there is tension around the topic, and/or reluctance to look at it clearly.

 

How might you bring more clarity, playfulness and positive creativity to the subject in your own life?

 

As we come into a new season of giving and receiving, and each new moment of living, I think it’s well worth considering how we might best clean up our thoughts and ideas about money in order to bring our best to all our future exchanges. Your imagination can be a powerful tool for jump-starting this process.  For example, you could play with imagining a divine hose that clears off any muck from your concepts of money, making way for fresh possibilities, and then act upon them.

 

It takes commitment to change old patterns. If there’s an idea in this article that appeals to you, or one of your own that comes to mind, you might begin there. Gratitude journals have been touted by Oprah and others for their effectiveness. How about keeping a “Re-Creating Money Journal” to reflect on your experiences with this?

 

Or consider the simplest thing you might begin doing right now toward improving your relationship with money and start there, adding your next step when ready.

 

If you prefer an in-depth re-creation of your relationship with money, you might consider implementing the program offered by Joe Dominguez and Vicki Robin in their classic book, Your Money or Your Life.

 

The world is what we make of it. Let’s bring our best to the topic of money and create our financial relationships anew. You might be amazed by all the other relationships this clears up too!

 

Roslyn Elena McGrath publishes Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, and shares energy, insights and  inspiration to shine your light at Empowering Lightworks.  She’ll be facilitating a “Maximum Manifesting Workshop” on Oct. 15, 2017 For more info., visit http://www.EmpoweringLightworks.com.

 

Adapted with permission from the Winter 2011 – 2012 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2011. All rights reserved.

*Join us for Myth-Busting & Self-Help Tips: YOUR Health & Happiness Forum, Saturday, Sept. 30th 2017, 1 pm – 4 pm in the Community Room on the lower level of the Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI, and help us celebrate our 10th Anniversary.  Click here for more info!

**FOLLOW us here and/or on Facebook to be entered to WIN in our 10th Anniversary drawing! 

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Creative Inspiration: Sticks & Stones, by Kevin McGrath

kevin-smiling-in-garden-2010.jpg

While many people are busy leveling their yards and trying to get the edges straight, spending countless hours making sure all the bushes and plants line up in a nice orderly fashion, clearing unwanted stones and dead wood, I am adding stones and wood, and creating surfaces both below and above ground level.

 
In retrospect, I was inspired by several factors. All of my life I have been in love with both dead and decaying wood and stones. A friend recently told me she believes my stone crush stems from my Irish ancestry. After all, Ireland is a country built with stone – stone fences, cobblestone streets, buildings and castles of granite, and the fields are scattered with outcroppings of this natural rock.
Each hardened sphere is unique in size, shape, color and weight. Especially when wet, their radiance shimmers and dances, exploding with a wide spectrum of color that tingles the senses. Dead and decaying wood are more subtly hued with grays and browns; however, they can often be seen joining forces with lichen and mosses to create a beautifully colored landscape.

 

I have always enjoyed seeing downed branches or trees in their artistic poses, curving and twisting as if in a snapshot of a wooded kind of ballet. Unearthed roots especially excite me, as this secret dark society, which usually lives underground, is finally revealed for all to see. If my stone love stems from my Gaelic descent, then perhaps my wood infatuation is derived from my Native American roots.

 
One can never be sure about these things of course, but I do know that decaying wood and stones have been favorites of mine since childhood. I know my most recent creative inspiration for incorporating these two natural wonders was inspired by a recent trip to New York’s Central Park. My son and I spent an afternoon there, frolicking along streams and through woods, up hills and down slopes, as we meandered along the winding paths.

 

This trip inspired me to take the things I love and, in a micro sort of way, create this hobbit type world in my own backyard. Inspiration can come from all sorts of things, whether from within, where the genes of a distant relative seek expression, or a place that draws you in and makes an impression to the point that you want to recreate it in your own way in a nearby location, where you can see the things you love spread out before you. I believe the most important point, however, is to listen to these urges and see what they bring you.

 
Given his fondness for sticks and stones, Kevin McGrath has been called by many names and is fine with that.

Reprinted with permission from the Summer 2010 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2010. All rights reserved.

*Join us for Myth-Busting & Self-Help Tips: YOUR Health & Happiness Forum, Saturday, Sept. 30th 2017, 1 pm – 4 pm in the Community Room on the lower level of the Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI, and help us celebrate our 10th Anniversary.  Click here for more info!

**FOLLOW us here and/or on Facebook to be entered to WIN in our 10th Anniversary drawing! 

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A Fresh Look at… Genealogy & Social Harmony, by Tyler Tichelaar

Genealogy was her favorite insanity. — Anthony Trollope

crown
When I start talking about genealogy, people often don’t understand how
I can get so excited about dead people. They might think the only reason
people are interested in genealogy is to claim descent from royalty or
someone famous. But genealogy teaches far more than ancestral pride.

My interest in genealogy began from stories my grandfather told me
about growing up in Marquette. After his death, I wanted to learn more
about my family, including why they had come to Marquette. To find out,
I visited the local cemeteries, the Family History Center at the LDS
Church in Harvey, the County Courthouse and the Marquette County
History Museum. I discovered my ancestor, Basil Bishop, had owned a
forge in New York and came to Marquette to work in the iron industry.
After learning a great deal about my Marquette ancestors, I decided I
wanted to know about their ancestors.

 
I learned Basil Bishop’s father and grandfathers had fought in the American
Revolution. Their ancestors had been New England Puritans. I discovered a
vast amount about the Puritans from researching those family members.
The most prominent ancestor was Thomas Dudley (1576-1653), second
governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He presided over the notorious
Anne Hutchinson trial and signed the charter to establish Harvard College.
Although Dudley is not a household name today, his contributions to
American history are vast. His descendants number in the tens of thousands
and include Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidential
Nominee John Kerry. But what about Governor Dudley’s ancestors?

Have you ever considered how many ancestors you have? You have 2
parents, 4 grandparents, 8 great-grandparents. Each generation back,
the number doubles. Thomas Dudley is my 11-greats grandfather—one
of 8,384 ancestors in that generation, and one of only 6 whose names I
know. I wish I knew the other 8,378 ancestors’ stories.

 
Another 7 generations back, to my 18-greats grandparents, provides over
one million ancestors in that generation. However, the numbers do not
consistently double because people married someone who was at least a
distant cousin, so many ancestors appear multiple times in a family tree.
The result—everyone ends up related in multiple ways. In fact, Thomas
Dudley is descended from King Alfred the Great (reigned 871-899) by 28
different lines.

 
My point isn’t to impress you with my ancestry but to reveal the human
family’s closeness. DNA research reveals that everyone of European
descent alive today is descended from everyone who lived in Europe and
had children before 1200 A.D. (See Mapping Human History by Steve
Olson). That means every white person alive is descended from
Charlemagne, Alfred the Great, and William the Conqueror.

 
Consider how such a connection affects questions of race. When people
ask what nationality I am, I might say Dutch or Irish because my ancestors
came to the United States from the Netherlands or Ireland, but because
I’m descended from everyone who lived in Europe and had children before
1200 A.D., I have ancestors from every European country from Spain to
Finland to Hungary to Greece. I’ve done the research to confirm it.

Genealogy proves that race does not exist. For example, one of Thomas
Dudley’s ancestors was King Edward III of England (reigned 1327-1377).
Was he really English? His mother was Isabella, Princess of France.
Isabella’s grandmother was Princess Isabel of Aragon (now part of Spain).
Her mother was Jolan, Princess of Hungary. Her great-grandmother
was a Russian princess, who was descended from Swedish royalty.

Racism becomes ridiculous when you consider the bigger picture. In
1066, William the Conqueror of Normandy defeated Harold the Saxon
King of England. I’m descended from both of them. Which side do I
take? I’m descended from Irish kings as well as the English kings who
invaded their lands.

 
Recently, I discovered I have Asian ancestors. One of my European
ancestors was a Byzantine emperor. He married a Persian shah’s daughter.
Her ancestors included Indian maharajahs and Chinese emperors. Xerxes
the Great (known today from the movie 300) is one of my countless Asian
ancestors. I may not look Chinese, Persian or Indian, but their blood
is mingled in me with the French, Polish, Hungarian and Swedish. No
doubt I have African ancestors also, whom I look forward to discovering.

My ancestry is your ancestry. Race does not exist. It’s time we realized
we are all one family and we need to get along.

 
Editorial note: Explore your own family history by joining the Marquette
County Genealogical Society, searching online at familysearch.org, researching
county records, and interviewing family members.

 
Tyler R. Tichelaar is the author of The Marquette Trilogy and recently
published The Children of Arthur series. Genealogy research inspired his
novels. For more information, visit http://www.MarquetteFiction.com.

Reprinted with permission from the Summer 2009 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2009. All rights reserved.

*Join us for Myth-Busting & Self-Help Tips: YOUR Health & Happiness Forum, Saturday, Sept. 30th 2017, 1 pm – 4 pm in the Community Room on the lower level of the Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI, and help us celebrate our 10th Anniversary.  Click here for more info!

**FOLLOW us here and/or on Facebook to be entered to WIN in our 10th Anniversary drawing! 

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Inner Nutrition: What Camp Means to Me, by Christine Saari

Photograph by Christine Saari

 

It all began with a clearing in the woods cluttered with ramshackle buildings from a former homestead: the remains of a cabin, a leaning barn, a decaying pig sty and chicken coop. I was horrified to learn this was to be the site for our camp. Why would we want a camp to begin with when we lived amidst a beautiful landscape waiting to be explored? “I’ll never come here,” I said to my husband. If he wanted a camp, so be it. I did not!

Jon proceeded without me. One day he took me to the transformed site – the buildings were gone, the clearing pristine. Then he purchased a 100-year old log cabin which had brambles growing inside and no windows and doors. Again I was aghast. But Jon was undeterred. The building was taken apart, transferred and rebuilt. Trees were felled for replacement logs, windows cut, doors made, layers of wallpaper stripped off the cedar logs. Endless work, but I participated, helped lay the floor, chinked, found furniture, worked to make the place cozy.

The two-story cabin has been proudly standing in our clearing since 1994, over time joined by a two-seater outhouse bought from an aunt, a shed and sauna rescued from a pasture for cows who rubbed the dovetailed corners round. Finnish relatives equipped the smoke sauna with a hearth and benches, and a deck was added to the house.

Although I said I’d never come, I have grown to love our camp above the West Branch of the Whitefish River. Why? What does camp mean for me?

With a thirty-mile trip, it is close enough from home to come for just an evening in the summer or for an overnight stay. Of course, if we can we stay longer, but whatever the length of our visit, we return to town refreshed.

Thanks to the “primitive” nature of the place – no electricity, a spring in the woods, a wood stove, life there slows down immediately. We forget about the news, e-mail or phone connection. Instead we make sure the kerosene lamps are filled for the evening and that there is enough wood to stay warm. This is a place just to be. We cook simple meals, talk, write letters, read and play scrabble. We take time to take a nap, we go to bed early. In summer we take canoe rides on the river, in winter we ski. We watch the natural world around us: a wild turkey has lost a beautiful feather, irises are blooming on the shore, a heron flies overhead.

Although we are close to a road, we seem far away from civilization. I can sunbathe unobserved. There are berries and mushrooms and flowers to pick. The stars shine brightly at night, the moon lights up the clearing, fireflies glow in the dark. Because the area is small, we have gotten to know it intimately. Every time we come we see changes. The river swells from melting snow, spring leaves unfold, white trilliums cover the dark forest floor. Here we are aware of the annual cycle of growth and decay and of our place in this universe.

Aside from all that, at camp we are surrounded by our ancestors: the flour bin reminds us of Jon’s grandmother’s farm. Jon’s father brought the cuckoo clock from the war in Europe, and camp brings me back to my childhood, to the Austrian mountain farm without electricity and running water where I grew up. Here I am connected to the past and to nature. Here I feel whole.

Christine Saari, an Austrian immigrant,  is a writer and visual artist. She has published a book, Love and War at Stag Farm, The Story of Hirschengut, an Austrian Mountain Farm 1938-48. It tells the story of her family in Austria during WWII and its aftermath.

Reprinted with permission from the Summer 2012 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

*Join us for Myth-Busting & Self-Help Tips: YOUR Health & Happiness Forum, Saturday, Sept. 30th 2017, 1 pm – 4 pm in the Community Room on the lower level of the Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI, and help us celebrate our 10th Anniversary.  Click here for more info!

**FOLLOW us here and/or on Facebook to be entered to WIN in our 10th Anniversary drawing! 

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Filed under Camp, Gifts from Nature, Inner Nutrition, Uncategorized