Tag Archives: U.P. holistic business

Holistic Animal Care: Help for Rescue Animals & Their People! Jenny Magli

help with rescue animal, holistic animal care, holistic wellness publication

I have experienced some wonderful rescue animals in my home over the years, and have great memories of all of them. It seems to be my “thing,” and I wouldn’t have it any other way. They are deserving of all the love and care they can get, especially since most of them have come from an abuse and/or neglect situation. Thank goodness there are now more no-kill shelters than ever before. There are also animals that are victims of circumstances when an owner has died. These often aging animals end up with other family or friends if they’re lucky, or a shelter situation if they’re not.

So here are some points to consider.

Please make sure you and your family are absolutely ready to commit to a lifetime of love and care for the animal you adopt. This includes medical care. If you are not 100% sure you are ready to adopt, you might consider fostering first. This way you get an idea of what it will take to care for the animal, and also get some guidance from a shelter along with veterinary care while the pet is with you. You might end up as a “foster fail” because you’ve fallen in love with the pet and wish to have it in your home for the rest of its life. This happens a lot, and is not a bad thing!

Prepare your home for this new addition. Pet proofing your home is important. Keep hazardous items out of reach. Remove loose cords or cables. Safely store medicines, cleaners and chemicals out of reach. Remove poisonous plants and anything that could potentially be chewed and/or swallowed.

Patience is key!

You are coming together typically not knowing much, if anything, about the animal’s past. If you are able to learn something, that’s a bonus! Time will be needed to get to know each other. Remember, typically the animal has come from a shelter or rescue situation, so it will likely be nervous, confused, anxious, scared, sad, bewildered, etc. Imagine how you would feel if you were in this animal’s position!

The first week is often the most challenging but also a wonderful discovery period. Your new pet needs some structure and guidance on what you expect from it, including where it will sleep, nap, eat, play, and so on. As you get through each day, you will learn more about each other. Don’t expect everything to go smoothly. It takes time to become familiar with each other and get into a routine. The animal needs time to adjust and warm up to you and your family, so give it space but also give love and attention. Pet, groom, and play with your pet. Providing a pet bed in a quiet area or crate creates a safe space where it can relax.

If you have other pets in the household, give them time to gradually get to know each other. Avoid forcing them to be together. Let this happen slowly, cautiously, and always with supervision!

Some training will be necessary.

Setting boundaries to stay off furniture and counters or teaching basic commands such as sit and stay are important from the start. If you have a pet with bad habits, or just have trouble with training on your own, there’s an abundance of trainers out there to help for a fee.

If you know the breed of the dog, it can be helpful to study about that breed to help you understand its character traits better.

Some frustration with the new pet is inevitable. Patience and time are needed to get through this first phase. You can do it!

Jenny is a Certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people, and a Healing Touch for Animals (Level 2) and NES BioEnergetics Practitioner. Consultations are done over the phone and through email. To contact, call or text (906) 235-3524 or email 1healthlink@gmail.com.

Excerpted from the Fall 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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About the Summer 2021 Cover Photo Keith Glendon

U.P. holistic business, U.P. holistic wellness publication

The healing, centering, powerful magic of Lake Superior is a foundation of strength—and a source of whimsical play, joy and fun for those who live and love here. Whether you’re a child, a child-at-heart or an adult who’s lost touch with your child-at-heart: Superior and the U.P. will speak wisdom to those who listen.

Photographer Keith Glendon is a devoted husband and father of four, poet, writer, joy-seeker, entrepreneur, founder of Campfire CoWorks in Marquette, believer in Spirit and optimistic advocate of a better world.

Excerpted with permission from the Summer 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Spotlight On… Blackbird Boutique with Owner Brett Stiles

Blackbird boutique, sustainable fashion, U.P. holistic business, U.P wellness publication

Tell us about Blackbird Boutique.


Blackbird carries anything from new vintage-inspired clothing to bohemian to more timeless, elegant classic pieces. I try to have quite a range in a small space, and for a range of ages too.

I spend a lot of time researching and networking with other designers and going to markets to find sustainable, ethical, fair trade clothing and accessories. I think it’s important to understand where your clothes come from and who made them. We carry a lot of things made from natural fibers. They’re more durable, and require less water to manufacture. A couple of brands I carry are zero waste. They use scrap materials that larger clothing manufacturers would have to get rid of, even whole bolts if there’s one little flaw, because they use machines. These are handmade, and if the fabric pieces are too small, they’ll use a more traditional patchwork style or weaving. Some lines use organic cotton or non-toxic, natural dyes. Some manufacturers say their items are natural but they still use copper and things to bring out more vibrant colors in clothing.

There’s a huge selection of locally made jewelry and artwork, gift items, accessories too, a little home décor as well—the little unexpected treasures that people find, whether it’s for themselves or gifts—little luxuries, little out-of-the-ordinary bits ’n bobs. I’m constantly on the hunt for unique jewelry, clothing, and accessories.


While it is difficult at times to be the sole proprietress of a business, it also has many rewards. Blackbird is really an extension of my life, philosophies and interests. It is challenging to have to wear so many hats—to be the creative force, as well as have the business mind that goes with it.


I think Blackbird fits well into the downtown Marquette scene. I feel I’ve created an inviting space and sometimes customers will just pop in for a little inspiration and because they love the way the shop makes them feel. I really can’t believe it’s been four years since Blackbird opened. I am excited to be a part of such a wonderful community here in downtown Marquette. 

Why did you open Blackbird?


I grew up with my mom having a boutique. I worked there summers early on during college, and I absolutely loved it—helping women find things that inspired them, and all the patterns and textures and colors of the fabrics. I enjoyed it so much, I was kind of hooked.

Even back then, opening something like Blackbird was always in the back of my mind. I wanted to do it so badly, and just always thought, “It’s not a practical thing. I can’t.” I was afraid of going for it.

I finished school, was living in Denver a while, working at the Clyfford Still Museum. Although I loved it there doing event planning and coordinating for donors or for weddings, I just had this calling. I wanted to do something that made more of an impact. And I was missing Michigan, the lake, and family. It was time to move back. So I decided to go for it.

At the time there wasn’t a lot in Marquette like what I had in mind. I was nervous not knowing what the reaction would be. I always wanted to do something that was good, that made a difference. Finding sustainable, fair trade, ethically-made clothing allows me to offer something good for people and the planet.

I went to Western Michigan University and Kendall College of Art & Design. I have a degree in English, and minors in Environmental Studies and Art History. My education and art background play a big role in the design of Blackbird as well the merchandise I carry. I try to bring in a sort of ethereal, otherworldly vibe, and to make women feel empowered by dressing in a way that respects their confidence. There are things you can’t really find anywhere else—unique pieces that are also timeless and versatile, and can be worn comfortably too, with interesting forms and natural fibers. They just feel better.

What’s new at Blackbird?

I just did a little update while we were closed for March. I took down a couple free-standing walls to open the space up a little bit more. Also, there is a new wall mural, some new lighting, and I’m adding a much needed second dressing room. The space definitely feels more open because of the changes made.

What do you find most challenging about running Blackbird?

So far, the pandemic has been the most challenging thing to go through, but I have managed to successfully stay on top of it by following health department guidelines and offering contactless payments and pick-ups, if people wish. Also, there is an online shopping option at www.blackbirdmqt.com. And while not all of my inventory shows up online because so many things are one-of-a-kind or small batch, I can take pictures of similar items for customers if they desire. It’s sort of a personal shopping experience, and I’ve worked with many people this way. 

What do you enjoy most about running it?

I enjoy my customers the most, definitely. I just love getting to know them, and I especially love the one-on-one experience. To connect with these women, and just have fun, and have them leave feeling really good about something they purchased, not just because it looks good on them, but also because they know it’s sustainable clothing. That’s something I really hold close to me, and what Blackbird is all about.

Excerpted with permission from the Summer 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Green Living: U.P. Style Re-Creation, Steve Waller

green living, green recreation, sustainable recreation in MI's Upper Peninsula, U.P. holistic business, U.P. wellness publication

The COVID freeze is thawing. We are waking from a yearlong hibernation, anxious for “normal,” ready to get back to work, enjoy family, friends, and summer fun. Life is restarting. Summer recreation can re-create our lifestyle and for many, lifestyle re-creation would be helpful.

The American Psychological Association’s latest “Stress in America” survey of 3,000 people indicates that since the pandemic began, about 42 percent of U.S. adults gained weight—29 pounds on average. About half of the weight-gainers added more than 15 pounds; 10 percent, more than 50 pounds. On average, men added 37 lbs., women added 22 pounds. Younger adults gained more than older people (millennials 41 pounds, baby boomers 16 pounds). Only 18 percent reported unwanted weight loss. Stress, lack of exercise, unhealthy changes in eating habits, and increased alcohol consumption are all contributing factors.

It’s time to get outside, but being dragged around by a gas-powered ATV, boat, jet ski, dirt bike, motorcycle. or even an automobile won’t help you get back in shape. Recreational gas burning burns gas, not calories. It increases your personal contribution to the global warming problem, not your metabolism. It’s time to re-create your idea of recreation.

U.P. forest trails, some of the best in the nation, are ready for hikers, talking with friends, without noisy gas burning ATVs.

Trails seem much longer, more peaceful, relaxing, and more interesting when on foot. As John Muir, the famous 19th century naturalist, said about his 1,000-mile walk to the Gulf (instead of traveling by train or stagecoach), “How can you see anything when you travel 40 miles in a day?”

Streets are ready for bicyclists running local errands instead of running gas-burning automobiles. Electric bicycles are waiting in local bike shops for those with 10 to 15-mile daily commutes to work, or for a couple of hours of awesome trail riding. Two wheels roar. Four wheels snore!

Swimming is healthy and fun. Snorkeling the U.P.’s clear-water lakes is fascinating. Even sailboats are better exercise. Noisy gas-burning boats or jet skis won’t get that beach body back in shape.

Besides, after a two-year study, the Michigan governor’s recent U.P. Energy Task Force report clearly states that we, all of us, must move away from fossil fuels.

The easy first step is to eliminate recreational gas burning and get healthier at the same time. It’s a win-win!Even converting gas-powered yard tools, mowers (including riding mowers), trimmers, and blowers to battery power reduces stress on your ears, eliminates gasoline, and minimizes fossil-powered pollution. Today, battery-powered tools are versatile workhorses that help you spend more time outdoors, peacefully.

After a 2020 dip in carbon dioxide emissions due to COVID-19, CO2 emissions are forecast to jump this year by the second biggest annual rise in history as people and global economies recover from the pandemic’s recession. Our “new normal” could easily just repeat the old toxic normal. Now is the time to start fresh with smarter habits and less fossil fuel.

Once you’ve paid your bills, put COVID relief money to good use. Don’t blow it on another couch-potato TV, cable or video game subscription. Cancel those subscriptions. Invest that money and freed time in gas-free products and activities. It’s time to dump that gas guzzler and buy an electric car. Install solar power. Replace gas furnaces and water heaters with a cold weather-rated, high-efficiency heat pump.

Explore the U.P. Keep our land, our air, and yourself in great shape. Re-create that pre-COVID body naturally by abandoning recreational gas burning, and physically enjoying the beautiful local places where we live.

Sources:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/the-big-number-a-major-pandemic-weight-gain/2021/04/16/cc347e3e-9dfd-11eb-9d05-ae06f4529ece_story.html
https://www.healthline.com/health-news/61-percent-of-americans-say-they-gained-weight-during-the-pandemic
https://www.michigan.gov/documents/egle/Report-UPETF-Phase-II_720856_7.pdf
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/apr/20/carbon-emissions-to-soar-in-2021-by-second-highest-rate-in-history

Steve Waller’s family lives in a wind- and solar-powered home. He has been involved with conservation and energy issues since the 1970s and frequently teaches about energy. Steve can be reached at Steve@UPWallers.net.

Excerpted with permission from the Summer 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Healthy Cooking: Grilling for Summer, Val Wilson

tofu kabobs, healthy grilling, healthy cooking, U.P. holistic business, U.P. holistic wellness publication

Summer is my favorite time of year. One of the reasons is because you can grill food outside. For some reason, food just seems to taste better to me when cooked outside. Be careful not to fall into the trap of thinking you have limited options of just grilling veggie burgers and veggie hot dogs if you are living a vegan or vegetarian lifestyle. I have experimented grilling many vegetables and other fun recipes such as the tofu kabobs described below.

Tofu is a great option when you are grilling. When you marinate tofu, it takes on the flavor of the marinade and creates a very tasty dish. Tofu is a complete protein. It contains all eight essential amino acids. It’s also is a good source of calcium and iron, plus it contains phosphorus, zinc, copper, magnesium, and vitamin B1.

Yellow summer squashes are one of my favorites on the grill. They have high water content, helping to keep you hydrated, and have lots of potassium and fiber. Carrots and radishes are high in antioxidants and contain potassium, which is essential for healthy blood pressure. And onions contain anti-inflammatory properties.

When creating this recipe, I chose the vegetables to give a rainbow of colors to the kabobs. These kabobs taste great when grilled. However, if you do not have a grill, you can cook them in a skillet or even bake them in the oven.


 
Tofu Kabobs

Wooden kabob sticks  
1 lb. fresh firm tofu  
1 onion (cut in chunks)  
4 carrots (cut in long, round diagonals)  
1 yellow summer squash (cut in cubes)  
20 radishes (cut in thick rounds)  

Marinade
1/3 cup tamari  
¼ cup each olive oil and water  
2 T. each brown rice vinegar and mirin  
1 T. brown rice syrup  
1 tsp. each basil and thyme  

Arrange the tofu and all the vegetables in a shallow dish, lying flat rather than stacked on top of each other. Whisk together the marinade ingredients and pour over the vegetables. Let marinate 30 minutes. Take the wooden kabob sticks and place the tofu chunks and vegetables on each one. Alternate the vegetables to make each one unique. Heat a skillet or grill and brown the kabobs on each side, or place the kabobs on a cookie sheet and bake at 350  degrees for 20 minutes. If grilling the kabobs on a barbecue, soak the wooden sticks in water for 20 minutes before making and grilling the kabobs. 

Chef Valerie Wilson has been teaching cooking classes since 1997. You can attend virtually including a special class through Peter White Public Library on 6/15/21. Visit http://www.macroval.com for schedule, cookbook purchases, phone consultations, or radio show, and follow her on Facebook at Macro Val Food.

Excerpted with permission from the Summer 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Senior Viewpoint: Head to Your Local Farmers Market ASAP! Kevin McGrath

U.P. holistic business, senior nutritional needs, value of farmers markets for seniors, U.P. wellness publication

Now that summer has begun taking hold, nutrient-rich soils are transferring more and more of their life-sustaining power to the herbs, grains and vegetables that we then consume and absorb. Our farmer’s markets play a vital role in not only making these fresh, healthy, in-season, locally grown foods available for our choosing, but also offer an open air venue where we can safely and easily engage as social beings again.

As a senior who has been primarily cooped up for over a year in an attempt to keep my fellow citizens and myself out of harm’s way and is finally fully vaccinated, I’ve come to truly appreciate the importance of fellowship. Social isolation can become a routine way of life for many seniors, pandemic or no. Farmers markets bring together humans of all ages, which can be particularly helpful for seniors’ vitality. And, as John Lennon once said, “A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is a reality.”


Social isolation has been shown to significantly increase your risk of dementia and premature death from all causes, maybe even more than smoking, obesity or physical activity. On top of that, according to the American Psychiatric Association, lonely seniors are more likely to smoke, drink in excess, and be less physically active. 


Additionally, we seniors actually need fewer calories, but more nutrient-rich meals.

Plant foods (vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans, and whole grains) tend to be nutrient dense and are also a great source of fiber, which can help prevent Type 2 diabetes, aid digestion, lower cholesterol, and help you maintain a healthy weight. Research supports filling at least half of your plate with vegetables and fruit at each meal.

To get the greatest nutritional value, as well as flavor, from your produce, you want it to have the shortest possible time between harvest and consumption, making your farmers market a winner again. Food imported from other states and countries is typically older, has been handled more (exposing it to more contamination risks), and sat in distribution centers before arriving at the store.

Another consideration that becomes clearer as I age is the importance of supporting local businesses. Our local economy can be hurt by having our produce transferred in from all over the world, and oftentimes even sold more cheaply. If we don’t support our local businesses with our purchases, and then wonder where all our local businesses went, whose responsibility is that?

Nationwide, growers selling locally create thirteen full time jobs per $1 million in revenue earned.

Those who do not sell locally create three. And dollars generated locally tend to circulate locally, bolstering the economic health of local businesses and families. Plus, if natural disasters continue to increase, affecting the growth and distribution of food from elsewhere, we’ll certainly become even more grateful to have locally-sourced options.

So with summer in full swing, I look forward to seeing my experienced neighbors and friends taking advantage of nature’s “farm-aceuticals” at our local farmer’s market, supporting our own health and that of our community.

While Kevin McGrath isn’t a farmer, he has the greatest respect and admiration for our local farming community and can be found visiting farmers markets wherever he may roam.

Research contributed by Roslyn McGrath, a fellow fan of food, farmers markets, useful info, helpful humans, and Mother Nature.

Excerpted with permission from the Summer 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Health & Homes: 10 Symptoms of Mold Exposure—and What to Do About It, Rich Beasley

U.P. holistic business, household mold detection, mold prevention, healthy homes, U.P. holistic wellness publication

With many of us spending more time indoors, ensuring safe air quality is more important than ever before. If your health has been feeling “off” lately, there may be an unexpected reason why: an undetected mold infestation in your home or apartment. Let’s look at some common warning signs that mold is becoming a health problem in your living space and explore some simple actions you can take to fix it.


Mold—A Pervasive Problem

Mold is a much more common problem in buildings and homes than many people think. When left untreated, it poses a significant risk to health and wellbeing. According to some estimates, roughly 70% of homes in the United States have mold of some kind. It’s important to remember that not all mold is dangerous to your health—but many are.

10 Health Symptoms of Mold Exposure

If you’re wondering if an unseen mold infestation could be affecting you or your family, an excellent place to start is by evaluating your health. If you’re currently experiencing one or several of the following symptoms, it’s time to take the next steps towards mitigating the problem (more on that shortly).

  1. Stuffy nose
  2. Sore throat
  3. Coughing or wheezing
  4. Tightness in the chest
  5. Hair loss
  6. Memory loss
  7. Brain fog
  8. Burning eyes
  9. Nosebleeds
  10. Skin rash

Mold exposure will affect each person differently, and this list is not exhaustive. For example, in asthmatic people or those with a mold allergy, reactions will be much more severe than in the general population. Additionally, immune-compromised people or those with chronic lung disease may develop severe infections in their lungs from mold exposure.


What Causes Mold in a Home?

Mold is an opportunistic scoundrel. It enters your home through ventilation, cracks in the walls, leaky roofing, and open doors or windows. Once in your home, mold will flourish on pretty much any surface imaginable, including household dust, insulation, drywall, carpet, fabric, paper, cardboard, wood, and much, much more. If you live in a humid climate (like Michigan), mold may be more of a concern as it thrives in damp areas. As a solution, it’s suggested that you keep your home at less than 50% humidity. A simple dehumidifier will do the trick in most cases.

What To Do When You Suspect a Mold Problem in Your Home

So, you’re feeling off and suspect that mold may be the cause. What’s your next best step?

  1. First, contact your healthcare provider right away to schedule a check-up.
  2. Second, do a thorough search in your home for signs of mold or evidence of water damage. Remove porous materials like carpet or drywall that you think may harbor mold.
    Thoroughly clean hard surfaces with a bleach solution.
  3. If you can’t find obvious signs of mold but still suspect it may be present, schedule a mold
    test with a local home inspector. A home inspector will look for signs of both active and
    prior water intrusion and existing mold in all safely accessible areas, and sample the air
    in your home for mold. Test results are typically available within three business days and
    will tell you whether there is indeed a mold infestation in your living space and whether any existing mold poses a risk to your health.

When it comes to mold, ignorance is not bliss. Listen to your body if something feels off. The sooner you identify the problem, the sooner you can mitigate risk and get back to enjoying your health and vitality.

Rich Beasley is an InterNACHI Certified Home Inspector and owner of UP Home Inspection, LLC. He holds over a dozen specialty certifications, including Mold Inspector, Radon Tester, Water Quality Tester, Indoor Air Consultant, and many more.

Excerpted with permission from the Summer 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Bodies in Motion: Spring into Your Boogie Shoes! Roslyn McGrath

physical fitness, U.P. holistic business, U.P. wellness publication

Feeling a drag in your step? A wish for a happier time, or place, or way of doing things? Or simply tired of the same old routine, the decreased options of a typical pandemic day?

Or perhaps you’re a skiing fan without enough snow, a hiker log-jammed by too much spring slush or mud, an active (or sedentary) person sidelined by an injury or long-term physical restriction?

There’s a form of exercise that can brighten your day, customize to your needs, be done inside or out (depending on your daring), express your preferences, and support your health and wellness.

I call it…. “Dance Party”!

Pretty much any tune you want to wiggle, jiggle, or sizzle to can be heard online nowadays. If you’re computer-challenged, get a little help from someone with a tad more tech savvy if needed, or simply pull out some CDs or cassette tapes. Bu not radio please, unless it’s ad and interruption-free, as you don’t want to break that flow. So queue up what you’re in the mood to move to, using multiple browser windows if necessary. If you’re not sure what you want, Google up your preferred genre for the day– danceable rock, show tunes, funk, bluegrass, disco, big band, etc., and have at it!

Dilemmas have you down and you need to vent your feelings? Go for those bluesy or dramatic tunes. Extra points for belting your heart out! Letting off some steam can go a long way in helping you cope. Just don’t make playing down-in-the-dumps music habitual, as it may then have the opposite effect.

Maybe you can’t move to the music the way you’d like to right now, or like you used to, but chances are you can move something. (And if you choose music from a time when you moved with ease, that may help some.) Start with whatever’s working best for you or feels fun—a foot, a finger, a hand, a head. Dancing from a seated position can be full of variety, and even freeing if you go into it with an open mind. You can tap, clap, and wiggle along, and move slower or faster to any tune. Explore what you can do without pushing the river. Notice as much as you can about how moving one part of your body affects another. The more you get your brain in this game, observing what’s happening, the better off you’ll be. Plus, this can keep your mind too busy to get “judge-y” on you. “Dance Party” is meant to be fun, not win prizes! You can do it in a safe way, and with as much privacy as you like, or get social by Zooming with friends, taking turns choosing music.

physical fitness, U.P. holistic business, U.P. wellness publication

If your mobility is not restricted or medically ill-advised, give yourself some freedom and move through as much open space as is reasonably available. Pay attention to what your body wants and needs as you go. If this is your first time dancing in a while, start with a shorter duration than you might expect, and build this up gradually. You can be an excellent biker, skier, or hiker without using your muscles, joints, and tendons in the ways you may when dancing.

Do your best to get your blood flowing, your parts moving, and that smile back on your face as you create your own Boogie Wonderland. Happy Spring!

Roslyn McGrath helps you live your true spirit to uplift your world through Empowering Lightworks & Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Visit EmpoweringLightworks.com for more info. on upcoming webinars, appointment scheduling and related products.

Excerpted with permission from the Spring 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Green Living: Electrified Beauty Steve Waller

green living, environmental sustainability, U.P. holistic business, winter sports, U.P. winter recreation

U.P. snowmobile trails are legendary. Sleds contribute huge economic benefits. They get us outside in winter to enjoy the season’s unique beauty. But there is a new opportunity available, a way to reverse the most ridiculous mismatch for our frozen forests.

Snowmobiles zip along at 60+ MPH with 150 horsepower, gas engines, a price tag of $10,000-$20,000, not including the trailer or tow truck, to push a ±200 lb. human across our winter wonderland. It’s ridiculous because a single horse, fueled only by grass, grain, and water can haul a log weighing 1,500 pounds. Horse loggers have done this for centuries and still do. Using 150 horses just to move a snowmobiler is severe overkill.

But I get it. The thrill, the feeling of power, speed, being on the edge, sticking that turn without going airborne into a tree, the shiny colors, the windproof heated gear, the chance to enjoy friends, good food, and an occasional beer. Sleds bring the roar of a combustion engine to our snowy silence, emitting 88 grams of carbon monoxide per kilometer, and 22 times the amount of nitrogen oxide and hydrocarbons emitted by a passenger car. But a new machine now cures the ills of those gas guzzlers.

Introducing— electric snowmobiles!

Acceleration? Zero to sixty in 3.5 seconds standard configuration (2.9 sec. performance configuration). 120 HP standard configuration (180 HP performance configuration); all under 600 lbs. Significantly more power than leading sled engines. Zero throttle lag. Unaffected by elevation, temperature, and riding style. Peak performance in all conditions. Range— 80 miles. DC fast re-charge to 80% in 20 minutes. AC 240V L2 charge in 2 hours. An advanced thermal management system ensures the battery will always be in its sweet spot—even when temperatures get as low as -40˚F. No starting problems ever. No pulleys, no oil, no maintenance, period. Save up to $2,500 in maintenance while spending less time in the garage, and more time riding.

Electric sleds are here. They outperform your existing fossil sled. For about the same price, you can end your recreational gas burning, and ride the hottest machine—cleaner, faster, more reliable, and absolutely quieter. Even those who live in the forest are more tolerant of sleds that don’t disturb our quiet winter. Electric snowmobiles have no emissions.

I know, you are going to freak out about charging. Everybody new to electric vehicles freaks out. “Range anxiety” is why you don’t already own an electric car. You worry about running out of energy. But thousands of electric car owners are beyond worry. They love their electric cars. Still, where do you charge your sled? What if you run out of charge?

The typical fossil sled has average fuel consumption of around 10-20 mpg so tank size matters. But how often do you ride 200 miles without stopping? If you can add 80% of charge to your sled in 20 minutes, you can get 60 more miles of charge in less time than you can drink a beer. Electric outlets are more abundant than gas stations. Your electric sled will be the center of attention. At $0.15kWh, a 27kWh sled battery costs $4 for a full charge from empty.

Electric sleds are another piece of our new way of life.

CO2 must go. Everything needs to be electrified—cars, sleds, ATVs, furnaces, trucks, stores, industries, mines, everything. Recreational gas burning must end. Electricity can and will fill the gap better, more cleanly, and more powerfully. The transition is happening now. The U.P. has finally started installing solar farms, bringing clean, stable, cost-effective energy to all of us. Feel the power. Ride electricity.

Sources:
https://taigamotors.ca/snowmobiles/
https://www.uky.edu/OtherOrgs/AppalFor/draftl.html#:~:text=A%20team%20of%20horses%20can%20pull%20a%20load%20of%20about,DBH%20and%2032%20feet%20long
https://elischolar.library.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1012&context=yale_fes_bulletin
https://mountainculturegroup.com/montreal-company-unveils-worlds-first-electric-snowmobile/

Steve Waller’s family lives in a wind- and solar-powered home. He has been involved with conservation and energy issues since the 1970s and frequently teaches about energy. Steve can be reached at Steve@UPWallers.net.

Excerpted with permission from the Spring 2021 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2021, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Healthy Cooking: Soybeans &Women’s Health,Val Wilson

soybeans and women's health, healthy cooking, U.P. holistic business, U.P. wellness publication

When it comes to keeping women strong and healthy, soybeans and products made with soybeans can be very helpful. Soybeans contain easily absorbable iron, many B vitamins, and carotin, support detoxification, promote vitality, and feed and nurture the lungs and large intestines.

Soybeans made into tofu are high in calcium. When made into tempeh, it is 19.5% protein. Containing all eight essential amino acids, it is a complete protein. When made into miso, it has 11 grams of complete protein in each tablespoon. And by fermenting it to make the miso, its healing properties are enhanced. Miso is a living food containing lactobacillus, a healthful micro-organism that aids digestion. There are so many wonderful health benefits from soy foods, I can see why we have been eating them for thousands of years.

Studies have shown soybeans can support your bones by reducing bone loss due to osteoporosis, helping to reduce the risk of fractures. Researchers conclude that their findings indicate postmenopausal women and others with low bone density could benefit from consuming soy.

I feel there is a lot of confusion about the plant-based phytoestrogen isoflavones found in soybeans. This part of the bean does not disrupt your estrogen levels, it balances them. If your estrogen level is too low, it raises it; if your estrogen level is too high, it lowers it. These isoflavones also have been credited with slowing the effects of osteoporosis, relieving some side effects of menopause, and alleviating some side effects of cancer. They have also been shown to dramatically lower the undesirable LDL cholesterol. It is interesting that in China, where they eat soybean products such as tofu, tempeh, and miso every day, until recently, they did not have a term in their language for hot flashes.

Tofu Kabobs

Wooden kabob sticks
1 lb. fresh firm tofu
1 onion (cut in chunks)
4 carrots (cut in long, round diagonals)
1 yellow summer squash (cut in cubes)
20 radishes (cut in thick rounds)

Marinade:
1/3 cup tamari
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup water
2 Tbsp. each: brown rice vinegar and mirin
1 Tbsp. brown rice syrup
1 tsp. basil
1 tsp. thyme

Arrange tofu and all vegetables in a shallow dish, lying flat and not stacked on top of each other. Whisk together marinade ingredients and pour over vegetables. Let marinate for 30 minutes. Take the wooden kabob sticks and place tofu chunks and vegetables on each one, alternating the vegetables to make each kabob unique. Heat a skillet and brown kabobs on each side, or place kabobs on a cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. To grill the kabobs, soak the wooden sticks in water for 20 minutes first, then prepare kabobs as described above before grilling.

Chef Valerie Wilson, a.k.a, Macro Val, has been teaching cooking classes since 1997. Visit her website to purchase her cookbook Year Round Healthy Holiday Cooking, set up a phone consultation, or listen to her radio show, http://www.macrval.com. Facebook, Macro Val Food.

Excerpted with permission from the Fall 2020 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine. Copyright 2020, Empowering Lightworks, LLC. All rights reserved.

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