Category Archives: Pet Care

Positive Parenting: Pet Care for Kids, Jenny Magli

Caring for family pets is a big responsibility! Pets need patience, love and attention, food and water, grooming, exercise, playtime, and medical care throughout their lives. Sounds a lot like what we all require, especially kids! So with that, it is important to remember that as kids are learning responsibilities in life, they also must learn that pets are living creatures that deserve to be treated kindly and with compassion, and that they are a lifetime commitment. This can be very time consuming, but well worth the effort. The level of responsibility you teach a child certainly depends on their age. How much responsibility do you think he or she can handle? What would be age-appropriate and considered safe for him or her to do? Overall, as a parent, you are responsible for supervision in pet caretaking by making sure the pet is well cared for.

Here are some points for promoting positive pet care:

  • If there is already a pet in the home, kids will have an idea of what it takes to care for one, but still may need oversight in overall pet care. If a pet is not yet in the home, it can be helpful to start with a “pretend animal” and teach kids the basics of care that way first.
  • Help kids understand that sometimes pets do not want attention, and give examples of what that looks like so they can be respectful of that.
  • Some pets like hugs and some don’t, so it’s important for kids to understand acceptable ways to show affection.
  • Teaching a gentle, calm approach with pets is important.
  • Sometimes it’s important to leave pets alone. This is especially true when they are not feeling well, or they’ve had an eventful day.
  • Teach kids how to interact appropriately with new animals. This includes animals they meet when you’re out around town. When you come across people walking their pets, always ask the owner before approaching an animal. Remind children they must always be respectful, gentle, and cautious when meeting new animals.
  • Make it easy for kids to complete their tasks. For instance, you can draw out instructions and tape to a food container so they know how much to feed the pet.
  • Children can easily become overwhelmed when too much is required of them, so finding a balance that keeps them enthused and participating without feeling overwhelmed is key.
  • Reward smaller kids with a daily “star” for their efforts in helping with a pet-related chore. Children need praise and reward for completing tasks. Positive reinforcement promotes positive results.
  • Offer an allowance of sorts for helping with pets. This could be in the form of a “point system” where a certain number of points are given for specific chores that can be cashed in later for various things.
  • A most valuable tool in teaching kids to be responsible pet caretakers is to set an example by fulfilling this role well ourselves!

Note: There are many books available on teaching kids how to interact with animals.

*Readers are reminded it is entirely of their own accord, right, and responsibility to make informed and educated decisions on their pet’s health care. Jenny Magli disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

Jenny is a Certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people, and an Animal Iridology, Healing Touch for Animals (Level 2) and NES Bioenergetics practitioner. She is available for consultations and presentations. She can be reached at (906) 235-3524 or 1healthlink@gmail.com.

Excerpted with permission from Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, Winter 2018-19 Issue, copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

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Holistic Animal Care: Go Green!

Ever wondered why dogs and cats tend to eat odd things at times, such as dirt, grass, feces, etc.? There are many reasons, one of which is the need to purge toxins from their system, especially after a long winter. Other reasons include a need for key nutrients. “Pica” is the name for this. It’s really a normal behavior. When an animal eats soil, he or she is usually in need of key minerals and other nutrients that they’re likely not getting from their food. Stool eating can be due to health issues or just plain learned behaviors. Some dogs will start eating poop when they aren’t absorbing enough nutrients, have parasites, or have issues with their pancreas. When they eat grass, the chlorella and other nutrients contained in it provide nutrition. It’s very nourishing, (kind of like a salad), and the texture of the grass (barbs) can also act as a stimulant or irritant to help the animal purge (vomit) something in their stomach that is making them feel ill. It’s important to be observant of your pets and their actions, as they may need to be checked out by a veterinarian.

One of the risks associated with grass eating is ingesting highly toxic chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers, which can cause many health issues. You can remedy this by adding powdered grasses, such as wheatgrass or barley grass juices, (yes, juices), or powders that you know come from clean sources, to your pet’s food. Wheatgrass juice, (or just plain wheat grass), is considered rejuvenating. It helps cells replenish enzymes, vitamins, hormones and nucleic acids, and restores vitality. It aids in cleansing the lymph system by restoring balance to the body, reduces inflammation, removes toxins and metals from the cells, nourishes the liver, skin, muscles, kidneys and many other organs, including the brain, and helps build and balance the blood and neutralize toxins. Blood sugar imbalances and chronic health disorders can improve as well.

It’s easy to grow organic wheat grass at home. Kits are available online. You can juice it for your pet or just let him/her mow off the grass from a container. If the task of growing your own wheatgrass seems too daunting, you can use powdered grass blends to sprinkle on food instead. Examples are “Barley Dog” or “Barley Cat.” I use “Calderra Greens,” which are for both humans and pets. It’s a blend of organic certified barley, alfalfa, wheat and oat grass juice powders and sea vegetation. The grasses are grown on volcanic soil and low temperature processed so the enzymes and soil organisms are intact.

Other greens you may want to consider are seaweed, kelp, blue green algae and spirulina. Seaweeds are considered the best of green foods as they are easy to digest. They are one of the richest sources of minerals and amino acids found in plants, nutrient dense, and immune system enhancing.

Kelp is also high in nutrient value. It helps animals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and colitis by aiding digestion. It’s also a good source of iodine, which helps the thyroid.

Blue green algae and spirulina are high in protein and nutrients as well.

As you can see, there are many “green” options available for enhancing your pet’s health. All the above are easily given with food or as a treat. Just a little each day is a great addition to your pet’s diet. Just remember to start out slowly with very small portions and watch to make sure your pet tolerates it well. If your pet shows you he or she doesn’t enjoy it, then it’s best to try something else.

Readers are reminded that it is entirely of their own accord, right and responsibility to make educated choices about their pet’s health care.  

 Jenny Magli, a certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people, is available for consultations and presentations, and lives in Rumely with her husband and five clowns (three dogs and two cats). She can be reached at (906) 235-3524, barkmewandyou@gmail.com.

This article was reprinted with permission from the Summer 2013 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

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