Tag Archives: holistic pet care

Holistic Animal Care: What to Do When Waldo Drives You Wacky, Jenny Magli

holistic animal care, U.P. holistic wellness publication, U.P. well-being publication, holistic health

I, for one, am a huge pet lover! I know I will never be without some furry creature in my life. They are wonderful companions, a joy to be around, and their unconditional love is hard to beat! But having pets does not come without challenges from time to time. Those of us with pets know there are times when not every household member is a happy camper. Behavior issues are inevitable at some point during a pet’s lifetime. From puppyhood to seniorhood, behaviors can change to varying degrees. This can be due to health issues, environmental influences, poor nutrition, and household changes such as the arrival of a new baby or departure of a family member. Behavior problems that may arise include barking (vocalization), biting, jumping up, aggression, begging, digging, inappropriate elimination, chasing, chewing, and more.

It’s important to remember that some behaviors are perfectly normal. For instance, chewing is a normal process for dogs. This makes it important to provide chewable toys and/or treats to help satisfy that urge so they don’t chew on inappropriate things (especially for puppies to help deal with teething). Cats need to scratch to sharpen their claws and leave their scent, so providing cat scratch posts throughout the home can help prevent their scratching on furniture. If we don’t accommodate animals with a way to relieve these natural tendencies, we’re contributing to potential problem behaviors.

Below are some examples of things to consider when dealing with behavior issues. Sometimes the remedy is simply look at the circumstances surrounding the issue.

Is your pet bored? Is he or she getting enough affection, exercise/playtime and mental stimulation? Exercise helps to release pent-up energy. A bored or lonely pet will find a way to entertain itself if it has no other outlet to do so. This can lead to destructive or aggressive behavior in the home. Sometimes working with a dog trainer or pet behaviorist can provide relief for both you and the pet. Providing rules and boundaries for your pet are crucial in maintaining a healthy relationship with your pet.

Is your pet exhibiting signs of health issues or pain? Changes in appetite, limping, sleepiness, sudden house soiling in a house-trained pet, hiding in unusual places, or sudden aggression can all be signs of underlying health issues. Out-of-the-norm behaviors may require a consult with a veterinarian.

Is your pet getting up in years? Older pets are more likely than young pets to develop medical and degenerative problems. Cognitive decline (dementia), and a loss of hearing and vision can contribute to changes in behavior. Extra patience is necessary when dealing with these factors, and veterinary monitoring of health is vital.

Is your pet being treated with kindness and compassion, or is he or she being abused, mishandled, or neglected by someone? Negative treatment toward an animal has the potential to cause aggressive and/or destructive behavior.

Reactions to vaccines can occur immediately, days, months, or even years afterwards, and can be a factor in both behavior and health issues such as fever, sluggishness, aggression, depression, loss of appetite, collapse, weakness, etc. Please do your homework here. More does not necessarily mean better! If your pet reacts to a vaccine, report it to your veterinarian, then consider doing only Titers to check for immune status. (Titers are blood tests done at the vet’s office). Note – the Rabies vaccine is the only vaccine required by law for your pet.

I hope you will give your pet the benefit of your love by doing all you can to help resolve any issues that appear during his or her lifetime!

*Readers are reminded it is entirely of their own accord, right, and responsibility to make informed and educated decisions/choices with their pet are health care. Jenny Magli disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

Jenny Magli is a Certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people, Healing Touch for Animals (Level 2) and NES Bioenergetics Practitioner. Consultations are done over the phone and through email. To contact, call (906) 235-3524 or email 1healthlink@gmail.com.

Reprinted with permission from the Spring 2019 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Holistic Animal Care, Jenny Magli, Uncategorized

Holistic Animal Care: Go Green!

Ever wondered why dogs and cats tend to eat odd things at times, such as dirt, grass, feces, etc.? There are many reasons, one of which is the need to purge toxins from their system, especially after a long winter. Other reasons include a need for key nutrients. “Pica” is the name for this. It’s really a normal behavior. When an animal eats soil, he or she is usually in need of key minerals and other nutrients that they’re likely not getting from their food. Stool eating can be due to health issues or just plain learned behaviors. Some dogs will start eating poop when they aren’t absorbing enough nutrients, have parasites, or have issues with their pancreas. When they eat grass, the chlorella and other nutrients contained in it provide nutrition. It’s very nourishing, (kind of like a salad), and the texture of the grass (barbs) can also act as a stimulant or irritant to help the animal purge (vomit) something in their stomach that is making them feel ill. It’s important to be observant of your pets and their actions, as they may need to be checked out by a veterinarian.

One of the risks associated with grass eating is ingesting highly toxic chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers, which can cause many health issues. You can remedy this by adding powdered grasses, such as wheatgrass or barley grass juices, (yes, juices), or powders that you know come from clean sources, to your pet’s food. Wheatgrass juice, (or just plain wheat grass), is considered rejuvenating. It helps cells replenish enzymes, vitamins, hormones and nucleic acids, and restores vitality. It aids in cleansing the lymph system by restoring balance to the body, reduces inflammation, removes toxins and metals from the cells, nourishes the liver, skin, muscles, kidneys and many other organs, including the brain, and helps build and balance the blood and neutralize toxins. Blood sugar imbalances and chronic health disorders can improve as well.

It’s easy to grow organic wheat grass at home. Kits are available online. You can juice it for your pet or just let him/her mow off the grass from a container. If the task of growing your own wheatgrass seems too daunting, you can use powdered grass blends to sprinkle on food instead. Examples are “Barley Dog” or “Barley Cat.” I use “Calderra Greens,” which are for both humans and pets. It’s a blend of organic certified barley, alfalfa, wheat and oat grass juice powders and sea vegetation. The grasses are grown on volcanic soil and low temperature processed so the enzymes and soil organisms are intact.

Other greens you may want to consider are seaweed, kelp, blue green algae and spirulina. Seaweeds are considered the best of green foods as they are easy to digest. They are one of the richest sources of minerals and amino acids found in plants, nutrient dense, and immune system enhancing.

Kelp is also high in nutrient value. It helps animals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and colitis by aiding digestion. It’s also a good source of iodine, which helps the thyroid.

Blue green algae and spirulina are high in protein and nutrients as well.

As you can see, there are many “green” options available for enhancing your pet’s health. All the above are easily given with food or as a treat. Just a little each day is a great addition to your pet’s diet. Just remember to start out slowly with very small portions and watch to make sure your pet tolerates it well. If your pet shows you he or she doesn’t enjoy it, then it’s best to try something else.

Readers are reminded that it is entirely of their own accord, right and responsibility to make educated choices about their pet’s health care.  

 Jenny Magli, a certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people, is available for consultations and presentations, and lives in Rumely with her husband and five clowns (three dogs and two cats). She can be reached at (906) 235-3524, barkmewandyou@gmail.com.

This article was reprinted with permission from the Summer 2013 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Holistic Animal Care, Jenny Magli, Pet Care