Tag Archives: Jenny Magli

The Wonders of Apple Cider Vinegar, by Jenny Magli

apple.jpgApple cider is known as Mother Nature’s miracle medicine!

Apple cider vinegar, (ACV), is a golden liquid concentrated with the healthy goodness of apples. It contains over 30 important nutrients, 12 minerals, essential acids and enzymes. The vitamins are bio-flavonoids, (vitamin P), beta-carotene, (precursor to vitamin A), vitamin C, E, B1, B2, and B6, and it has a large dose of pectin for a healthy heart.

ACV is inexpensive, easy to use and it benefits our health in many ways. ACV can benefit both people and their pets. It is antibacterial, anti-fungal and boosts the immune system. As a high potassium electrolyte balancer, it helps re-mineralize the body and normalize the blood’s ph balance. ACV is the natural king of skin remedies. It is wonderful for itching and scratching pets as well as a superb skin and hair conditioner. Good old apple cider vinegar, straight or diluted 50/50 with water can be applied directly to the affected area and allowed to dry. It will kill bacteria on hot spots, eliminate dandruff, rejuvenate hair and skin, and help sweeten and balance the pH levels in the body.

Apple cider vinegar is a powerful detoxifying and purifying agent. It breaks down fatty, mucous and phlegm deposits within the body. By breaking down these substances it improves the health and function of the vital organs, such as the kidneys, bladder and liver, by preventing excessively alkaline urine. Put a tablespoon of ACV in your dog’s drinking water every day and you will no longer have those brown spots in your lawn from the dog’s urine.

It also promotes digestion, assimilation and elimination, while neutralizing toxic substances that enter the body. It has been found to neutralize harmful bacteria that may be found in certain foods. While dogs and cats do not have to worry too much about the bacteria in raw meat, if you are in doubt, you can pour a little apple cider vinegar over the questionable item.

ACV can also be beneficial for symptoms such as tooth decay and splitting of your dog’s toenails, which can be symptoms of potassium deficiency. Potassium is essential for the replacement of worn-out tissues within the body. This mineral is also as important to soft tissue repair as calcium is to the bones and teeth, which makes it a wonderful supplement for senior dogs.

ACV can be beneficial in the treatment of arthritis, as a supplement added to your pet’s daily water supply (or poured over the food) or with compresses soaked in hot, (not scalding) ,vinegar applied directly to the joints. It can also be helpful when used to treat allergies, candida, (yeast), constipation, muscle cramps, diarrhea, ear discharge, eczema, fatigue, kidney stones, kidney and bladder problems, slow metabolism, and stiff joints, and many other maladies.

The supplementation of ACV has been known to remove naturally  red tear stains around pet’s eyes from the inside out. It is also used to prevent fleas when used in a rinse for the dog’s coat after a bath.

There is nothing beneficial about commercial distilled vinegars except for pickling, cleaning and disinfection! So be sure to get natural apple cider vinegar, which you can find in health food stores. It should be a rich amber color with the “mother” quite visible as sediment on the bottom.

Jenny is a Certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people, and an Animal Iridology and Healing Touch for Animals (Level 2) practitioner. She is available for consultations and presentations and can be reached at (906) 235-3524 or 1healthlink@gmail.com.

Reprinted with permission from the Spring 2010 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2010. All rights reserved.

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Holistic Animal Care: It’s All In the Hair!

As a natural health consultant and concerned pet guardian/parent, I often look for affordable, no-stress, non-threatening (meaning no poking with needles or prodding with instruments), effective ways to help clients address health issues. I also often wonder whether animals are really getting all the nutrients they need from their diet. Sometimes what we think is the “best food” is just not enough. Hair Analysis is a procedure that fits the bill.

 

Hair Analysis is a holistic non-invasive process. A sample of hair is collected and sent to a lab to check for harmful toxins, metals and nutritional levels in the body. Humans have benefitted from its use for many years and now pets are too. Hair analysis can detect health problems well before symptoms begin. Illness takes time to manifest, so why not be a detective so you can put preventive measures in place to minimize or even avoid potential health problems? Hair analysis can also help you determine whether your pets’ diet is appropriate.

 

Blood serum levels can often be misleading, as the body compensates for shortages when needed. For instance, blood calcium levels may appear to be in the normal range, but this may be due to the body smartly pulling calcium from the bones when it detects a shortage, leading to a false reading. Hair analysis works differently from blood tests. Since hair doesn’t have the ability to “control” minerals or compensate for shortages or excesses, imbalances can sometimes show up years before you’d see symptoms.

 

Exposure to toxins can be mild or extreme, and since toxins are difficult to get out of the body, they tend to accumulate. And the animals’ ability to detoxify may be hastened by other health issues or by constant exposure to even more toxins. Animals are at greater risk of toxin exposure because they’re closer to the ground, pick up toxins on their feet and ingest through grooming (licking their feet or coat), or may be exposed through flea and tick chemicals, over-vaccination, contaminated food and water, or even household chemical cleaning agents and medications. Hair analysis often can help you figure out what you can change in or around your home to reduce toxin exposure before it causes a health issue.

 

Nutritional imbalances and deficiencies can be difficult to detect through traditional blood analysis or urine testing. Hair analysis offers a way to see whether your animal is either lacking or getting too much of a certain mineral or nutrient. Then you can determine whether a change in diet or addition of certain supplements will correct this, and/or whether other measures need to be taken to help your animal detoxify. Companies you can contact for a hair analysis include Gracefulearth.com, Peak-Health-Now.com and AskaHomeopath.net.

 

Readers are reminded that it is entirely of their own accord, and their right and responsibility to make educated choices for their pet’s health care.  

 

Jenny is a Certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people. She is available for consultations and presentations. She lives in Rumely with her husband and 5 clowns (3 dogs and 2 cats). She can be reached at (906) 235-3524 or email at barkmewandyou@gmail.com.

This article was reprinted with permission from the Spring 2014 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

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Holistic Animal Care: Go Green!

Ever wondered why dogs and cats tend to eat odd things at times, such as dirt, grass, feces, etc.? There are many reasons, one of which is the need to purge toxins from their system, especially after a long winter. Other reasons include a need for key nutrients. “Pica” is the name for this. It’s really a normal behavior. When an animal eats soil, he or she is usually in need of key minerals and other nutrients that they’re likely not getting from their food. Stool eating can be due to health issues or just plain learned behaviors. Some dogs will start eating poop when they aren’t absorbing enough nutrients, have parasites, or have issues with their pancreas. When they eat grass, the chlorella and other nutrients contained in it provide nutrition. It’s very nourishing, (kind of like a salad), and the texture of the grass (barbs) can also act as a stimulant or irritant to help the animal purge (vomit) something in their stomach that is making them feel ill. It’s important to be observant of your pets and their actions, as they may need to be checked out by a veterinarian.

One of the risks associated with grass eating is ingesting highly toxic chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers, which can cause many health issues. You can remedy this by adding powdered grasses, such as wheatgrass or barley grass juices, (yes, juices), or powders that you know come from clean sources, to your pet’s food. Wheatgrass juice, (or just plain wheat grass), is considered rejuvenating. It helps cells replenish enzymes, vitamins, hormones and nucleic acids, and restores vitality. It aids in cleansing the lymph system by restoring balance to the body, reduces inflammation, removes toxins and metals from the cells, nourishes the liver, skin, muscles, kidneys and many other organs, including the brain, and helps build and balance the blood and neutralize toxins. Blood sugar imbalances and chronic health disorders can improve as well.

It’s easy to grow organic wheat grass at home. Kits are available online. You can juice it for your pet or just let him/her mow off the grass from a container. If the task of growing your own wheatgrass seems too daunting, you can use powdered grass blends to sprinkle on food instead. Examples are “Barley Dog” or “Barley Cat.” I use “Calderra Greens,” which are for both humans and pets. It’s a blend of organic certified barley, alfalfa, wheat and oat grass juice powders and sea vegetation. The grasses are grown on volcanic soil and low temperature processed so the enzymes and soil organisms are intact.

Other greens you may want to consider are seaweed, kelp, blue green algae and spirulina. Seaweeds are considered the best of green foods as they are easy to digest. They are one of the richest sources of minerals and amino acids found in plants, nutrient dense, and immune system enhancing.

Kelp is also high in nutrient value. It helps animals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and colitis by aiding digestion. It’s also a good source of iodine, which helps the thyroid.

Blue green algae and spirulina are high in protein and nutrients as well.

As you can see, there are many “green” options available for enhancing your pet’s health. All the above are easily given with food or as a treat. Just a little each day is a great addition to your pet’s diet. Just remember to start out slowly with very small portions and watch to make sure your pet tolerates it well. If your pet shows you he or she doesn’t enjoy it, then it’s best to try something else.

Readers are reminded that it is entirely of their own accord, right and responsibility to make educated choices about their pet’s health care.  

 Jenny Magli, a certified Natural Health Consultant for pets and their people, is available for consultations and presentations, and lives in Rumely with her husband and five clowns (three dogs and two cats). She can be reached at (906) 235-3524, barkmewandyou@gmail.com.

This article was reprinted with permission from the Summer 2013 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

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Celebrating Our Fifth Anniversary!

by Roslyn McGrath

Anniversaries can be a great opportunity to reflect upon and celebrate what got you there, as well as what is and what can be, and refine and recommit to your vision of what you’re celebrating as you move forward.

Five years ago, I recognized the need for a truly local wellness publication, one where community members share their expertise and insight with us, increasing our understanding of the many ways we can increase our health and happiness and the many wellness resources available locally to support us in this

A big thank you to each of our writers –regular column writers Barb Dupras, Victoria Jungwirth, Jenny Magli, Miriam Moeller, Jessica Nagelkirk, Heidi Stevenson, Steve Waller and Val Wilson, as well as all those who’ve contributed articles and photographs along the way, (see full list on p.3), who so impress me with the quality and care they bring to each article. I and our many readers get to learn so much every time!

A big thank you to all our advertisers, whose passion and purpose are a big part of what makes our community tick, and who help make presenting this wealth of wellness information possible. I think you’ll enjoy discovering more about what their big hearts and expertise gift our community on pages 10 and 11 of this issue! And please consider letting them know how much you appreciate all they do.

A big thank you to proofreader Tyler Tichelaaar for his expert eyes and mind, kind heart and helpfulness, Curtis Kyllonen for his years of cheerfully and faithfully getting over a quarter of our many copies to where they need to go, to Tom O’Connell for making our early covers beautiful, to the various photographers whose eyes for local scenes have also helped create beautiful covers, to all our print shop helpers who’ve assisted me in getting the job done right, the many businesses and organizations who’ve made a place for Health & Happiness to be easily picked up, and to my husband, Kevin McGrath, for always pitching in with whatever’s needed, whether it’s a warm hug and smile, sound advice, listening ears, great ideas, timely deliveries, inspiring, light-hearted articles or encouraging words.

And a big thank you to YOU, our readers, for all your support and appreciation. You make it all worthwhile!

It’s the support of all of you that has made it possible to cover topics ranging from cooking with rutabaga to traditional Chinese medicine, child rearing tips to overcoming writer’s block, mortgage and energy-saving advice to mindfulness practices, pet treat recipes to U.P. kayaking, long distance elder care to wild crafting and so much more; increase our distribution to 7,500 copies at over 250 locations, five times where we started five years ago, (and there are still places where we run out of copies!); and further invest in our community with donations to the Beaumier Upper Peninsula Heritage Center, Devos Art Museum, Great Lakes Recovery Centers, Hiawatha Music Festival, Huron Mountain Club Gallery, Lake Superior Hospice, Marquette Arts & Culture Center, Marquette County Health Department, Marquette Maritime Museum, Marquette Regional History Center, Medical Care Access Coalition, Northern Initiatives, Oasis Gallery, UPAWS, Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum, and Upper Peninsula Environmental Coalition’s Celebrate the U.P.

Below are a few excerpts of the congratulations I’ve received on our fifth anniversary. Thank you so much to all those who’ve made a point of expressing their appreciation, whether in person or in writing!

I look forward to continuing to serve our community’s wellness information needs with high quality and creativity, as well as launching our five year commitment to supporting a different area of community life each year through increased coverage and donations, starting this year with the increasingly important issue of elder care.

So fittingly, this issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine is dedicated to the topics of celebration, age and “fives” – enjoy!

Roslyn Elena McGrath, Publisher, Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine

 I want to congratulate you on your fifth anniversary of Health & Happiness. Every cover has been beautiful and the wide array of articles has provided a wealth of information and insight to readers. Your vision of a need and your willingness and excitement to fill that need has been remarkable. Here’s to many more issues! – Gareth Zellmer 

Congratulations on the 5th anniversary of Health and Happiness!  It’s some of the best reading to come out of our “far northern outpost” community.  May the coming year be the best yet; here’s to five more! – Sue Schenk Drobny 

Congratulations from Natural Connections!  We celebrate you for your commitment and passion in providing a wonderfully effective information connection between our holistic community and U.P. residents through your beautiful magazine, Health & Happiness!

Happy 5th Anniversary from Lake Superior Holistic Connection!   Your magazine is a bright light in our community!  It’s a beacon illuminating paths of possibility to those seeking natural ways to align their body, mind, spirit!  Congrats! – Diana Oman

It’s a joy, truly an inspiration to witness this evolution of Health & Happiness, how you have brought this brilliant idea, an idea that lit you up and lit us up as well, into manifestation.  I look forward to receiving this uplifting publication with its focus on our possibilities and potential, and the labor of love that you as creator, as bridge-maker, as editor, as publisher, as marketer have put into each and every issue.  It is a template for all of us, the way that you have taken a dream and made it reality, learning the next step and the next step as you’ve walked this creative path.  And look how we all benefit, what you have brought to all of us!  – Helen Haskell Remien

Health & Happiness’s Contributing Writers & Photographers, 2007 – 2012:

Leslie Allen, Linda Andriacchi, Stuart Baker, Leslie Bek, Gina Brown, Audra Campbell, Lisa Cerasoli, Joan Chadde, Pam Christenson, Amy Clickner, Stuart Cooper, Patty Cornish, Martha Crenshaw, Kim Danielson, Sarah Dean, Chuck Delpier, Sara DeFrancesco, Melinda Dollhopf, Barb Dupras, Cindy Engle, Sydney Giovenco, Lee Goodwin, Genean Granger, Kathy Harsch, Victoria Jungwirth, Kristen Karls, Kim Kee, Mick Kiaros, Virginia Kleaver, Amanda Klein, Tammy Krassick, Lucy LaFaive, Jamie LaFreniere, Betsy Little, Jeaneen Luokkala, Alanna Luttenton, Dawn Lundin, Jenny Magli, Karen Mallinger, Amy Mattson, Kevin McGrath, Roslyn McGrath, Lisa McKenzie, Brian McMillan, Kristine McPeak, Miriam Moeller, Neil Moran, Mohey Mowafy, Jessica Nagelkirk, Kim Nixon, Colleen O’Hara, Valerie Olson, Diana Oman, Marissa Palomaki, Kris Harris Pfaffle, Phil Poutinen, Gretchen Preston, Diane Raven, Robert Regis, Helen Haskell Remien, Carol Rose, Sherri Rule, Christine Saari, Jon Saari, Diane Sautter, Deb Sergey, Dar Shepherd, Mary Soper, Jennifer Stelly, Heidi Stevenson, Tyler Tichelaar, Lynn Vanwelsenaers, Cassandra Vore, Steve Waller, Nicole Walton, Fran Walters, Cynthia Whitehouse, Val Wilson, Gareth Zellmer, & Joseph Zyble.

Reprinted with permission from the Fall 2012 issue of Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine, copyright 2012.

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Tale of a Tripod, J. Magli, NHC

This is the story of Cailynn, a three-legged dog. I hope it will give you a better understanding of special needs pets and what a wonderful addition they can be to any family. Lots of animals in shelters are overlooked , just as four-legged pets can. You just need a little more thought, consideration, love and devotion before adopting.
 

Tripods are dogs that have had a limb amputated. This can be due to cancer, as a result of severe injury to a limb, or a birth defect that makes the leg nonfunctional. Tripods are often viewed as pitiful and their care automatically considered a burden. However, complications of amputations are rare and most tripods not only adapt quickly to life on three legs, but also thrive. Some need a little help. Others don’t really want any help. But with extra patience, devotion, time and lots of love, a tripod can have a happy life. 

A few years ago, after many years of adopting physically and mentally abused or neglected animals, (mainly dogs and cats), we decided to adopt again. We already had two dogs, (one was severely abused), and two cats. All came from a shelter or a rescue. I happened across a young dog with which I connected instantly. She’d been abused and then hit by a car, resulting in the loss of her right front leg, all within her first six months of life. She was fostered and then adopted by a wonderful family. Due to a conflict with other pets, it was decided that Cailynn needed a different home. After the family interviewed me, I brought her home. She is the epitome of joy and happiness and reinforces for us daily how every moment should be lived to its fullest potential. She seems totally unaware that she only has three legs! She runs, plays and lives just like our other dogs do. She just has to rest more often. 

Some special considerations should be made regarding caring for a tripod. A lot depends on the circumstances around the loss of limb and what, if any, health issues are in play. Careful consideration must be factored into the overall regimen for the animal. Always start with a quality holistic dog food. Supplementing the diet with quality fish oil and glucosamine HCL will reduce inflammation and help maintain flexibility.

Sometimes tripods have trouble navigating stairs or smooth tile, so non-skid surfaces are needed. Lifting the animal in and out of a car is recommended to avoid additional injuries. Check footpads for cracking, cuts and abrasions, and address by applying a balm when needed. Keep toenails trimmed to avoid tripping. Exercise regularly but at a minimum to avoid overdoing it. Elevating the food dish can reduce strain on the other legs at feeding time.

There are many products on the market to help make a tripod’s life more manageable, like stairs or ramps, lifts, harnesses, slings, etc. There are support groups, forums and health tips geared towards tripods both online and in some communities.

I hope if you’re considering adopting a tripod, or are faced with a decision of amputation for your own pet, that you’ll remember there’s much love and life in these special animals. They will warm your hearts with their focus on life rather than limitations.

Cailynn is a joy to have in our family. We feel very blessed she chose us to teach and remind daily that life really is what WE make of it, and we’d better have fun too!

Jenny Magli is a natural health consultant for pets and their people. She lives in the Upper Peninsula with her husband Bill and five clowns (three dogs and two cats). She is available for consultations and presentations and can be reached at (906) 439-5489 or 1healthlink@gmail.com.

 Reprinted from Health & Happiness U.P. Magazine’s Spring 2011 Issue. 

 

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